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 Grade (4) Four Social Studies
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Topic: Geography                                        Grade 4         Rev. 4/29/05


Learning Outcomes
Teaching/Learning Strategies
  • Determine absolute locations (latitude and longitude) of places studied using a map.
  • Interpret a variety of maps (e.g., political, landform, historical, elevation, transportation) using information from its title, compass rose, scale, and legend.
  • On a map of North America, identify the regions of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Canada’s provinces and major cities, and Mexico’s major cities.
  • On a map of North America, locate the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi and Rio Grande Rivers, the Great Lakes, Hudson Bay, and the Rocky and Appalachian Mountain ranges.
  • Identify U.S. states and their capitals, major physical features, and natural resources of each region of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.
  • Identify and describe unique features of the U.S. (e.g., the Everglades, Grand Canyon, Mt. Rushmore, the Redwood Forest, Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park)
  • Compare/contrast the climate, major physical features and major natural resources of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.
  • Given an atlas and global grids, students find the address of various places in the world using latitude and longitude.  
  • Students explore their school grounds and create regional maps that include a title, compass rose, scale, and legend.
  • Using a variety of maps (political, landform, historical, elevation, and     transportation), students will identify the map from its title and note that every map has a compass rose and a scale.
  • Students will be able to create their own distance scale maps in both miles and kilometers.
  • Working in teams, students play a Jeopardy game that requires them to identify U.S. regions, Puerto Rico, Canada’s provinces and major cities, rivers and mountain ranges, basic geographical terms, etc.
  • In alignment with MA State Frameworks’ Standards: (LS 4.8, 4.9, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.14, 4.17, 4.18, 4.23, 4.24)
  • Values/Attitudes
  • Resources
  • Assessment
  • Develop an awareness of the location of their hometown in relation to the rest of the world.
  • Expand their vision of the entire world that God created.
http://www.eduref.org (for Ask Eric lesson plans)
Large atlases
Fabulous Facts About the 50 States by Wilma S. Ross
Scholastic Atlas of the U.S. by David Rubel
United States of America: A State by State Guide by Millie Miller & Cyndi Nelson
  • Students locate specific cities given latitude and longitude coordinates.
  • Students correctly make and label parts of a map that includes a distance scale, legend, and compass rose.
  • School ground maps are assessed using a rubric that considers their observations, data collecting, and mapmaking skills.
  • A performance checklist is used to record the students in each team who are able to contribute to answering the jeopardy questions.

Topic: Economics                                        Grade 4                 Rev. 4/29/05


Learning Outcomes
Teaching/Learning Strategies
  • Define and give examples of U.S. natural resources.
  • Identify the 5 regions of the U.S., the specific states in each region and compare and contrast the differences of each region (e.g., weather, climate, housing, goods and services provided).
  • Describe the climate, major physical characteristics, and major natural resources of each region of the United States, Canada and Mexico and explain their relationship to settlement, trade, and their economics.
  • Give examples of limited and unlimited resources and explain how scarcity compels people and communities to make choices about goods and services; giving up some things to get other things.
  • Give examples of how the interaction of buyers and sellers influences the prices of goods and services in markets.


∙Students should understand the varied roles of government and the effect of economic decisions in the distribution of goods and services.
Understand and explain the interdependence of the 5 regions of the United States to meet the wants and needs of our country.







Students identify renewable and non-renewable resources within the U.S. by region.  
In alignment with MA State Frameworks’ Standards: (LS 4.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.18, 4.24).
Values/Attitudes
Resources
Assessment
  • Stress the ingenuity of man to use the resources from the earth to meet food, shelter, and clothing needs.
  • Recognize God’s perfect plan when He made the world.
  • How we treat our earth now greatly impacts what will be available in the future.
  • Careful planning and use must be made of this great gift from God.
  • Recognize the interdependence of the regions of the U.S.





  • Locate and label the five regions on a blank map.
  • A written test will require students to define and correctly use economic terms, and identify regional goods and services.
  • Chart the distance traveled to transport goods from one region to the next.



Topic: Civics and Government                                    Grade 4                 Rev. 4/29/05

Learning Outcomes
Teaching/Learning Strategies
  • Examine the climate, major physical characteristics, and major natural resources of both Canada and Mexico and how they are shared with the U.S.
  • Give examples of immigration from Canada and Mexico due to their location near the U.S.
  • List the major rights that immigrants have acquired as citizens of the U.S. (e.g., the right to vote, and freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and petition).
  • Analyze the different ways immigrants can become citizens of the U.S.
  • Explain the roles of the 3 branches of government and the leaders in each branch.
  • Students discuss the relationship between Canada and Mexico to the U.S. Compare and contrast climate, major physical characteristics, and natural resources.
  • Use the AOL site to have students research where they live using a world satellite photo or topographical maps. Then students compare and contrast where they live with a city in each of the five regions.
  • Ask relatives about how they obtained American citizenship and present this information to the class.  Why did they leave their homeland to come to America?
In alignment with MA State Frameworks’ Standards:
(LS 4.17, 4.18, 4.19, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, 4.24, 4.25, 4.26)
Values/Attitudes
Resources
Assessment
  • Acceptance and tolerance of others leads to living peacefully.
  • Knowing about different cultures helps people to deal with others in a more understanding way.
  • Learn about the importance of cooperation.


Students label Canadian and Mexican maps.

Students are assessed on the content of their debate and whether or not they can support their views.

Students write a five paragraph composition, or make a presentation, relating how a relative obtained citizenship.

Create and display a web of the countries where their relatives came from.









Topic: History                                  Grade 4                 Rev 4/29/05

Learning Outcomes
Teaching/Learning Strategies
  • Observe and describe national historical sites and explain their function and significance.
  • Identify the different European countries that influenced different regions of the present U.S., and at the time the New World was being explored. Describe how their influence can be traced to place names, architectural features, and language.
  • Describe the diverse nature of the American people by identifying the distinctive contributions to American culture by past and present peoples (e.g., Native American tribes, African Americans, European immigrants, Spanish-speaking and Asian immigrants of the 19th & 20th centuries).
  • Identify the major immigrant groups that live in the United States now and show their locations.
  • Observe and describe major monuments and historical sites in and around Washington, D.C. (e.g., The White House, Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, The Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, The Golden Gate Bridge)
.
  • Using the Internet, or blank maps, students locate and label major landforms and major sites in history. (e.g., current boundaries of the United States, the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains, the Mississippi River, the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, the Interior Plains, the southwest desert, and the Great Lakes)
  • Using maps, explain the differences between states, territories and provinces, and be able to compare them
  • In alignment with MA State Frameworks’ Standards: (LS 4.13, 4.14, 4.15, 4.16, 4.19, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.25, 4.26)
  • Values/Attitudes
  • Resources
  • Assessment
  • Develop an understanding of the hard work and dedication it took to create the major sites in the U.S.
  • Appreciate the beauty of the landforms that God created in the U.S. and the world.


  • Students correctly locate and label major landforms and major sites in American history.
  • Graph immigration (census information) of incoming immigrants during the 19th and 20th centuries.